Calendar

Fellowship Events

Friday, December 4, 2015

John of Damascus

Priest
b. c.645
d. December 4, 749

Given that Saint Thomas Church is full of images in stone, wood and glass, the church building as we know it could not exist if John of Damascus and others were not successful in arguing against the Iconoclasts.

Lesser Feasts and Fasts (2006) explains his contribution in this way:

John of Damascus was the son of a Christian tax collector for the Mohammedan Caliph of Damascus. At an early age, he succeeded his father in this office. In about 715, he entered the monastery of St. Sabas near Jerusalem. There he devoted himself to an ascetic life and to the study of the Fathers.

In the same year that John was ordained priest, 726, the Byzantine Emperor Leo the Isaurian published his first edict against the Holy Images, which signaled the formal outbreak of the iconoclastic controversy. The edict forbade the veneration of sacred images, or icons, and ordered their destruction. In 729–730, John wrote three “Apologies (or Treatises) against the Iconoclasts and in Defense of the Holy Images.” He argued that such pictures were not idols, for they represented neither false gods nor even the true God in his divine nature; but only saints, or our Lord as man. He further distinguished between the respect, or veneration (proskynesis), that is properly paid to created beings, and the worship (latreia), that is properly given only to God.

The iconoclast case rested, in part, upon the Monophysite heresy, which held that Christ had only one nature, and since that nature was divine, it would be improper to represent him by material substances such as wood and paint. The Monophysite heresy was condemned by the Council of Chalcedon in 451.

At issue also was the heresy of Manichaeism, which held that matter itself was essentially evil. In both of these heresies, John maintained, the Lord’s incarnation was rejected. The Seventh Ecumenical Council, in 787, decreed that crosses, icons, the book of the Gospels, and other sacred objects were to receive reverence or veneration, expressed by salutations, incense, and lights, because the honor paid to them passed on to that which they represented. True worship (latreia), however, was due to God alone.

John also wrote a great synthesis of theology, The Fount of Knowledge, of which the last part, “On the Orthodox Faith,” is best known.

To Anglicans, John is best known as the author of the Easter hymns, “Thou hallowed chosen morn of praise,” “Come, ye faithful, raise the strain,” and “The day of resurrection.”

At Saint Thomas, we sometimes sing the first one (#198 in the Hymnal 1982) at Evensong during Eastertide, and we often sing the latter two (#200 and #210) on Easter Day.

Collect:

Confirm our minds, O Lord, in the mysteries of the true faith, set forth with power by thy servant John of Damascus; that we, with him, confessing Jesus to be true God and true Man, and singing the praises of the risen Lord, may, by the power of the resurrection, attain to eternal joy; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

12:45 pm – 1:45 pm, Living Room, Parish House
Father Spurlock offers a straight-forward bible study.

Sunday, December 6, 2015

THE SECOND SUNDAY OF ADVENT

In Year C, the Gospel for the Second Sunday of Advent at the morning services is Luke 3:1-6: Now in the fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar, Pontius Pilate being governor of Judaea, and Herod being tetrarch of Galilee, and his brother Philip tetrarch of Ituraea and of the region of Trachonitis, and Lysanias the tetrarch of Abilene, Annas and Caiaphas being the high priests, the word of God came unto John the son of Zacharias in the wilderness. And he came into all the country about Jordan, preaching the baptism of repentance for the remission of sins; As it is written in the book of the words of Esaias the prophet, saying, The voice of one crying in the wilderness, Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make his paths straight.Every valley shall be filled, and every mountain and hill shall be brought low; and the crooked shall be made straight, and the rough ways shall be made smooth; And all flesh shall see the salvation of God.

You might be interested in reading some sermons in the archive about John the Baptist.

Collect:

Merciful God, who sent thy messengers the prophets to preach repentance and prepare the way for our salvation: Give us grace to heed their warnings and forsake our sins, that we may greet with joy the coming of Jesus Christ our Redeemer; who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

9:45 am – 10:30 am, 2nd Floor, Parish House
12:30 pm – 1:15 pm, 2nd Floor, Parish House

Tuesday, December 8, 2015

The Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Collect:

O God, who in her conception didst wondrously preserve the mother of thine only-begotten from all stain of sin: grant, we beseech thee, that strengthened by her intercession we may be enabled in purity of heart to take part in her festival. Through the same Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

1:00 pm – 3:00 pm, Living Room, Parish House

Friday, December 11, 2015

12:45 pm – 1:45 pm, Living Room, Parish House
Father Spurlock offers a straight-forward bible study.

Sunday, December 13, 2015

THE THIRD SUNDAY OF ADVENT (Gaudete)

Gaudete literally means "rejoice," for the Lord is coming! And so on this Sunday you'll notice that the Advent purple gives way to a splash of rose. The frontal on the altar changes, the vestments of the clergy change, there are flowers, and the third candle—a rose one—is lit on the advent wreath. All of this is a bit of joy breaking into what is otherwise a penetential season.

If you pay attention to the order of service at the 11am Festal Eucharist, you'll notice that it includes (for the first time this Church Year) the Summary of the Law (Matthew 22:37-40) and the Comfortable Words (Matthew 11:28, John 3:16, 1 Timothy 1:15 and 1 John 2:1-2). Why do these suddenly appear in the liturgy when, on typical Sunday mornings at Saint Thomas, they are not said? Because these words are indeed a comfort to all faithful who are penitent, and therefore are appropriate for this Sunday of joy and comfort in the midst of a penetential season. You'll hear the same words said in Lent, on Laetare Sunday, which is the Lenten equivalent to Advent's Gaudete.

Joy also permeates the Liturgy of the Word. Notice, for example, that both the Old Testament Lesson and the Epistle for Year C have the word "rejoice" in them—Sing, O daughter of Zion; shout, O Israel; be glad and rejoice with all the heart, O daughter of Jerusalem [Zephaniah 3:14] and Rejoice in the Lord always: and again I say, Rejoice [Philippians 4:4].

Collect:

Stir up thy power, O Lord, and with great might come among us; and, because we are sorely hindered by our sins, let thy bountiful grace and mercy speedily help and deliver us; through Jesus Christ our Lord, to whom, with thee and the Holy Ghost, be honor and glory, world without end. Amen.

9:45 am – 10:30 am, 2nd Floor, Parish House
12:30 pm – 1:15 pm, 2nd Floor, Parish House
5:00 pm, off-site at a Midtown Location
The Saint Thomas Young Adults (those in and around their 20s) gather this evening at the end of the 4pm Evensong.

Friday, December 18, 2015

Ember Friday

A series of three Ember Days (on Wednesday, Friday and Saturday) are observed four times a year:

(1) following the Third Sunday of Advent
(2) following the First Sunday in Lent
(3) following the Day of Pentecost (Whitsunday)
(4) following Holy Cross Day

A major feast day overrides an Ember Day if they fall on the same day.

Ember Days, traditionally seasonal days of fasting and prayer, became over time associated with ordination of clergy and with prayer for the Church.

Collect:

O God, who didst lead thy holy apostles to ordain ministers in every place: Grant that thy Church, under the guidance of the Holy Spirit, may choose suitable persons for the ministry of Word and Sacrament, and may uphold them in their work for the extension of thy kingdom; through him who is the Shepherd and Bishop of our souls, Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the same Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

12:45 pm – 1:45 pm, Living Room, Parish House
Father Spurlock offers a straight-forward bible study.

Sunday, December 20, 2015

THE FOURTH SUNDAY OF ADVENT

At Saint Thomas, we keep the propers for the Fourth Sunday of Advent at the 8am and 9am services. As such, the appointed collect and lessons follow the lectionary, and the sermon corresponds. Therefore, if you seek a traditional Fourth Sunday of Advent service, consider attending at 8am (said) or 9am (sung).

At 11am and 4pm, we offer Lessons and Carols. The 4pm service is the traditional Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols and it does not include a Mass. The Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols is repeated on Christmas Eve at 4pm.

Collect:

We beseech thee, Almighty God, to purify our consciences by thy daily visitation, that when thy Son our Lord cometh he may find in us a mansion prepared for himself; through the same Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

9:45 am – 10:30 am, 2nd Floor, Parish House
12:30 pm – 1:15 pm, 2nd Floor, Parish House

Sunday, December 27, 2015

THE FIRST SUNDAY AFTER CHRISTMAS DAY

Today's Gospel, in which Saint John unfolds the mystery of the Incarnation, is also read each year at Lessons & Carols and on Christmas Day.

Collect:

Almighty God, who hast poured upon us the new light of thine incarnate Word: Grant that the same light, enkindled in our hearts, may shine forth in our lives; through the same Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

9:45 am – 10:30 am, 2nd Floor, Parish House
12:30 pm – 1:15 pm, 2nd Floor, Parish House