Calendar

All Worship Services

Tuesday, December 1, 2015

Nicholas Ferrar

Deacon
d. 1637

Collect:

Lord God, make us worthy of your perfect love; that, with your deacon Nicholas Ferrar and his household, we may rule ourselves according to your Word, and serve you with our whole heart; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

8:00 am, Chantry Chapel
12:10 pm, Chantry Chapel
This Mass includes a healing service of Holy Unction.
5:30 pm, Chantry Chapel

Wednesday, December 2, 2015

Channing Moore Williams

Missionary Bishop in China and Japan
d. 1910 

Fr Austin writes:

Today in our church we remember Bishop Williams, who was born in Richmond, Va., volunteered for work in China, became bishop to China and Japan and ended up spending most of his life in Japan. He died exactly 100 years ago today. You can read the short biography for him in Lesser Feasts and Fasts.

In that biography, note these dates: he began work in Nagasaki in 1859; in 1866 his first convert was baptized. Seven years of faithful work without a single baptism: what faith he must have had!

Collect:

Almighty and everlasting God, we thank thee for thy servant Channing Moore Williams, whom thou didst call to preach the Gospel to the people of China and Japan. Raise up, we beseech thee, in this and every land vangelists and heralds of thy kingdom, that thy Church may proclaim the unsearchable riches of our Savior Jesus Christ; who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

8:00 am, Chantry Chapel
12:10 pm, Chantry Chapel
5:30 pm, High Altar
Sung by the Gentleman of the Choir.
6:15 pm, High Altar

Thursday, December 3, 2015

8:00 am, Chantry Chapel
12:10 pm, Chantry Chapel
5:30 pm, Chantry Chapel

Friday, December 4, 2015

John of Damascus

Priest
b. c.645
d. December 4, 749

Given that Saint Thomas Church is full of images in stone, wood and glass, the church building as we know it could not exist if John of Damascus and others were not successful in arguing against the Iconoclasts.

Lesser Feasts and Fasts (2006) explains his contribution in this way:

John of Damascus was the son of a Christian tax collector for the Mohammedan Caliph of Damascus. At an early age, he succeeded his father in this office. In about 715, he entered the monastery of St. Sabas near Jerusalem. There he devoted himself to an ascetic life and to the study of the Fathers.

In the same year that John was ordained priest, 726, the Byzantine Emperor Leo the Isaurian published his first edict against the Holy Images, which signaled the formal outbreak of the iconoclastic controversy. The edict forbade the veneration of sacred images, or icons, and ordered their destruction. In 729–730, John wrote three “Apologies (or Treatises) against the Iconoclasts and in Defense of the Holy Images.” He argued that such pictures were not idols, for they represented neither false gods nor even the true God in his divine nature; but only saints, or our Lord as man. He further distinguished between the respect, or veneration (proskynesis), that is properly paid to created beings, and the worship (latreia), that is properly given only to God.

The iconoclast case rested, in part, upon the Monophysite heresy, which held that Christ had only one nature, and since that nature was divine, it would be improper to represent him by material substances such as wood and paint. The Monophysite heresy was condemned by the Council of Chalcedon in 451.

At issue also was the heresy of Manichaeism, which held that matter itself was essentially evil. In both of these heresies, John maintained, the Lord’s incarnation was rejected. The Seventh Ecumenical Council, in 787, decreed that crosses, icons, the book of the Gospels, and other sacred objects were to receive reverence or veneration, expressed by salutations, incense, and lights, because the honor paid to them passed on to that which they represented. True worship (latreia), however, was due to God alone.

John also wrote a great synthesis of theology, The Fount of Knowledge, of which the last part, “On the Orthodox Faith,” is best known.

To Anglicans, John is best known as the author of the Easter hymns, “Thou hallowed chosen morn of praise,” “Come, ye faithful, raise the strain,” and “The day of resurrection.”

At Saint Thomas, we sometimes sing the first one (#198 in the Hymnal 1982) at Evensong during Eastertide, and we often sing the latter two (#200 and #210) on Easter Day.

Collect:

Confirm our minds, O Lord, in the mysteries of the true faith, set forth with power by thy servant John of Damascus; that we, with him, confessing Jesus to be true God and true Man, and singing the praises of the risen Lord, may, by the power of the resurrection, attain to eternal joy; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

8:00 am, Chantry Chapel
12:10 pm, Chantry Chapel
5:30 pm, Chantry Chapel

Saturday, December 5, 2015

12:10 pm, Chantry Chapel
4:00 pm, High Altar
Sung by the Gentlemen of the Choir.

Sunday, December 6, 2015

THE SECOND SUNDAY OF ADVENT

In Year C, the Gospel for the Second Sunday of Advent at the morning services is Luke 3:1-6: Now in the fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar, Pontius Pilate being governor of Judaea, and Herod being tetrarch of Galilee, and his brother Philip tetrarch of Ituraea and of the region of Trachonitis, and Lysanias the tetrarch of Abilene, Annas and Caiaphas being the high priests, the word of God came unto John the son of Zacharias in the wilderness. And he came into all the country about Jordan, preaching the baptism of repentance for the remission of sins; As it is written in the book of the words of Esaias the prophet, saying, The voice of one crying in the wilderness, Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make his paths straight.Every valley shall be filled, and every mountain and hill shall be brought low; and the crooked shall be made straight, and the rough ways shall be made smooth; And all flesh shall see the salvation of God.

You might be interested in reading some sermons in the archive about John the Baptist.

Collect:

Merciful God, who sent thy messengers the prophets to preach repentance and prepare the way for our salvation: Give us grace to heed their warnings and forsake our sins, that we may greet with joy the coming of Jesus Christ our Redeemer; who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

8:00 am, Chantry Chapel
9:00 am, High Altar
Sung by the Junior Choristers.
11:00 am, High Altar
Sung by the Saint Thomas Choir of Men and Boys. Sermon by Fr Spurlock.
4:00 pm, High Altar
Sung by the Saint Thomas Choir of Men and Boys. Sermon by Fr Daniels.

Monday, December 7, 2015

Ambrose

Bishop of Milan
b. c.340
d. 397

Lesser Feasts and Fasts (2006) recounts the life of Ambrose as follows:

Ambrose was the son of a Roman governor in Gaul, and in 373 he himself was governor in Upper Italy. Though brought up in a Christian family, Ambrose had not been baptized. He became involved in the election of a Bishop of Milan only as mediator between the battling factions of Arians and orthodox Christians. The election was important, because the victorious party would control the powerful see of Milan.

Ambrose exhorted the nearly riotous mob to keep the peace and to obey the law. Suddenly both sides raised the cry, “Ambrose shall be our bishop!” He protested, but the people persisted. Hastily baptized, he was ordained bishop on December 7, 373.

Ambrose rapidly won renown as a defender of orthodoxy against Arianism and as a statesman of the Church. He was also a skillful hymnodist. He introduced antiphonal chanting to enrich the liturgy, and wrote straightforward, practical discourses to educate his people in such matters of doctrine as Baptism, the Trinity, the Eucharist, and the Person of Christ. His persuasive preaching was an important factor in the conversion of Augustine of Hippo.
Ambrose did not fear to rebuke emperors, including the hot-headed Theodosius, whom he forced to do public penance for the slaughter of several thousand citizens of Salonika.

About Baptism, Ambrose wrote: “After the font (of baptism), the Holy Spirit is poured on you, ‘the spirit of wisdom and understanding, the spirit of counsel and strength, the spirit of knowledge and godliness, and the spirit of holy fear’” (De Sacramentis 3.8).

A meditation attributed to him includes these words: “Lord Jesus Christ, you are for me medicine when I am sick; you are my strength when I need help; you are life itself when I fear death; you are the way when I long for heaven; you are light when all is dark; you are my food when I need nourishment.”

Among hymns attributed to Ambrose are “The eternal gifts of Christ the King,” “O Splendor of God’s glory bright,” and a series of hymns for the Little Hours.

At Saint Thomas we sing the first one, #234 in the Hymnal 1982, every now and again at Choral Evensong.

Collect:

O God, who didst give to thy servant Ambrose grace eloquently to proclaim thy righteousness in the great congregation, and fearlessly to bear reproach for the honor of thy Name: Mercifully grant to all bishops and pastors such excellency in preaching, and fidelity in ministering thy Word, that thy people may be partakers with them of the glory that shall be revealed; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

8:00 am, Chantry Chapel
12:10 pm, Chantry Chapel
5:30 pm, Chantry Chapel

Tuesday, December 8, 2015

The Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Collect:

O God, who in her conception didst wondrously preserve the mother of thine only-begotten from all stain of sin: grant, we beseech thee, that strengthened by her intercession we may be enabled in purity of heart to take part in her festival. Through the same Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

8:00 am, Chantry Chapel
12:10 pm, Chantry Chapel
This Mass includes a healing service of Holy Unction.
5:30 pm, Chantry Chapel

Wednesday, December 9, 2015

8:00 am, Chantry Chapel
12:10 pm, Chantry Chapel
5:30 pm, Chantry Chapel

Thursday, December 10, 2015

8:00 am, Chantry Chapel
12:10 pm, Chantry Chapel