Calendar

Concerts

Tuesday, December 4, 2018

John of Damascus

Priest
b. c.645
d. December 4, 749

Given that Saint Thomas Church is full of images in stone, wood and glass, the church building as we know it could not exist if John of Damascus and others were not successful in arguing against the Iconoclasts.

Lesser Feasts and Fasts (2006) explains his contribution in this way:

John of Damascus was the son of a Christian tax collector for the Mohammedan Caliph of Damascus. At an early age, he succeeded his father in this office. In about 715, he entered the monastery of St. Sabas near Jerusalem. There he devoted himself to an ascetic life and to the study of the Fathers.

In the same year that John was ordained priest, 726, the Byzantine Emperor Leo the Isaurian published his first edict against the Holy Images, which signaled the formal outbreak of the iconoclastic controversy. The edict forbade the veneration of sacred images, or icons, and ordered their destruction. In 729–730, John wrote three “Apologies (or Treatises) against the Iconoclasts and in Defense of the Holy Images.” He argued that such pictures were not idols, for they represented neither false gods nor even the true God in his divine nature; but only saints, or our Lord as man. He further distinguished between the respect, or veneration (proskynesis), that is properly paid to created beings, and the worship (latreia), that is properly given only to God.

The iconoclast case rested, in part, upon the Monophysite heresy, which held that Christ had only one nature, and since that nature was divine, it would be improper to represent him by material substances such as wood and paint. The Monophysite heresy was condemned by the Council of Chalcedon in 451.

At issue also was the heresy of Manichaeism, which held that matter itself was essentially evil. In both of these heresies, John maintained, the Lord’s incarnation was rejected. The Seventh Ecumenical Council, in 787, decreed that crosses, icons, the book of the Gospels, and other sacred objects were to receive reverence or veneration, expressed by salutations, incense, and lights, because the honor paid to them passed on to that which they represented. True worship (latreia), however, was due to God alone.

John also wrote a great synthesis of theology, The Fount of Knowledge, of which the last part, “On the Orthodox Faith,” is best known.

To Anglicans, John is best known as the author of the Easter hymns, “Thou hallowed chosen morn of praise,” “Come, ye faithful, raise the strain,” and “The day of resurrection.”

At Saint Thomas, we sometimes sing the first one (#198 in the Hymnal 1982) at Evensong during Eastertide, and we often sing the latter two (#200 and #210) on Easter Day.

Collect:

Confirm our minds, O Lord, in the mysteries of the true faith, set forth with power by thy servant John of Damascus; that we, with him, confessing Jesus to be true God and true Man, and singing the praises of the risen Lord, may, by the power of the resurrection, attain to eternal joy; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

7:30 pm – 10:30 pm, Saint Thomas Church
The Saint Thomas Choir of Men and Boys combines forces with the period instrumentalists of New York Baroque Incorporated, soprano Elizabeth Weisberg, mezzo-soprano Meg Bragle, tenor Thomas Cooley and bass Alexander Dobson to celebrate Christmas with the much anticipated annual performances of Handel’s Messiah. Daniel Hyde conducts.

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Thursday, December 6, 2018

Nicholas

Bishop of Myra
d. 342 

From the Rector’s Sermon for Christmas Eve 2008:

A few days ago a parishioner sent me the famous editorial from the September 21, 1897 New York Sun, written in response to an eight-year-old girl’s letter, “Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus,” which you can find online. “How dreary would the world be,” it says, “if there were no Santa. It would be as dreary as if there were no Virginias. There would no childlike faith then, no poetry, no romance to make tolerable this existence.” Indeed.

But if Virginia grew to adulthood and were interested, she could have discovered that behind Santa Claus is Saint Nicholas of Myra, a fourth century bishop in Asia Minor beloved for his care for the poor, for waifs and orphans, and for sailors. Saint Nicholas was one of the bishops who approved the Nicene Creed which we are about to say. So behind him is the Child of Bethlehem, very God of very God who for us came down from heaven. Love really did come down at Christmas.

Collect:

Almighty God, who in thy love didst give to thy servant Nicholas of Myra a perpetual name for deeds of kindness both on land and sea: Grant, we pray thee, that thy Church may never cease to work for the happiness of children, the safety of sailors, the relief of the poor, and the help of those tossed by tempests of doubt or grief; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

7:30 pm – 10:30 pm, Saint Thomas Church
The Saint Thomas Choir of Men and Boys combines forces with the period instrumentalists of New York Baroque Incorporated, soprano Elizabeth Weisberg, mezzo-soprano Meg Bragle, tenor Thomas Cooley and bass Alexander Dobson to celebrate Christmas with the much anticipated annual performances of Handel’s Messiah. Daniel Hyde conducts.

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Thursday, December 13, 2018

5:30 pm – 6:45 pm, Saint Thomas Church
Performances of Benjamin Britten’s haunting work for boys’ choir and harp at Saint Thomas go back to the nineteen-seventies. Join us this holiday season to experience the spirit of Christmas with this dramatic sequence of carols and other holiday works.

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Monday, April 1, 2019

7:30 pm – 9:30 pm, Saint Thomas Church
The Choir of King’s College, Cambridge, needs no introduction, having performed to audiences at Saint Thomas Church many times in the past. As arguably the most famous choir of its type in the world, and justly known for its annual broadcast of Nine Lessons and Carols on Christmas Eve, the men and boys will be touring the USA for the last time under their current Director of Music, Stephen Cleobury. Concerts at Saint Thomas is honored to have this opportunity to salute Stephen after 37 years of service, and to wish him well in his forthcoming retirement.

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Thursday, April 11, 2019

7:30 pm – 10:30 pm, Saint Thomas Church
With such emotional weight, and in a perfect balance of drama and spirituality, Johann Sebastian Bach’s St. John Passion has become synonymous with Passiontide and Easter observances around the world. Daniel Hyde conducts New York Baroque Incorporated with soloists, Dann Coakwell, Sarah Brailey, Jay Carter, Mark Bleeke, and Andrew Padgett.

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Monday, April 15, 2019

7:00 pm, Saint Thomas Church
Originally an improvised symphony on liturgical themes, Marcel Dupré’s Symphonie-Passion is a kaleidoscopic representation of the life of Christ in four movements; Advent, Christmas, Crucifixion and Resurrection. The symphony draws heavily on Gregorian chant and promises to show off the full range of color and power of the Miller-Scott Organ. No tickets required, donation requested.

Tuesday, April 16, 2019

6:45 pm – 7:45 pm, Saint Thomas Church
Paul de Maleingreau’s Symphonie de la Passion vividly depicts pivotal events from the Passion of Christ. The symphony draws heavily on Gregorian chant and promises to show off the full range of color and power of the Miller Scott organ. No tickets required, donation requested.

Thursday, May 9, 2019

6:00 pm – 7:30 pm, Saint Thomas Church
At an earlier-than-usual start time, New York Baroque Incorporated joins Benjamin Sheen and Daniel Hyde in a program of chamber music celebrating the Martha J. Dodge Continuo Organ and a new harpsichord recently purchased from Willard Martin. Vivaldi’s evergreen depiction of Spring sets the scene for two concerti by Handel and Bach, both of which weave tapestries of musical counterpoint for all the hands of the orchestra. An intimate early evening performance looking towards Memorial Day and the New York summer.

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