Calendar

Events

Monday, February 1, 2016

Brigid

aka Bride

Collect:

Everliving God, we rejoice today in the fellowship of thy blessed servant Brigid, and we give thee thanks for her life of devoted service. Inspire us with life and light, and give us perseverance to serve thee all our days; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who with thee and the Holy Spirit liveth and reigneth, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

12:00 am
Canon Turner reflects on the work of religious orders that tend to the needs of the marginalized, poor, and sick.
7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance
8:00 am, Chantry Chapel
12:10 pm, Chantry Chapel
12:30 pm – 1:30 pm, Saint Thomas Church Parish House
12:40 pm – 1:20 pm, Living Room, Parish House
This class will introduce the classic collect form, and will then look at many of the collects, drawing out from them an implicit and distinctive Anglican theology. This is a repeat of the Sunday Class.
5:30 pm, Chantry Chapel

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

THE PRESENTATION (CANDLEMAS)

Candlemas is always the 40th day of Christmas, or February 2, when, according to the Gospel of Luke, Mary and Joseph took Jesus to the temple. In 2018, in addition to celebrating Candlemas on Friday, February 2, we also are celebrating on Sunday, February 4 so that the maximum number of people can participate and so that we can hear music associated with the feast day.

Here is the account beginning at verse 22 of Luke, chapter 2:

And when the days of her purification according to the law of Moses were accomplished, they brought him to Jerusalem, to present him to the Lord; (as it is written in the law of the LORD, Every male that openeth the womb shall be called holy to the Lord;) and to offer a sacrifice according to that which is said in the law of the Lord, A pair of turtledoves, or two young pigeons.

And, behold, there was a man in Jerusalem, whose name was Simeon; and the same man was just and devout, waiting for the consolation of Israel: and the Holy Ghost was upon him. And it was revealed unto him by the Holy Ghost, that he should not see death, before he had seen the Lord's Christ. And he came by the Spirit into the temple: and when the parents brought in the child Jesus, to do for him after the custom of the law, then took he him up in his arms, and blessed God, and said,

Lord, now lettest thou thy servant depart in peace, according to thy word: for mine eyes have seen thy salvation, which thou hast prepared before the face of all people; a light to lighten the Gentiles, and the glory of thy people Israel.

And Joseph and his mother marvelled at those things which were spoken of him. And Simeon blessed them, and said unto Mary his mother, Behold, this child is set for the fall and rising again of many in Israel; and for a sign which shall be spoken against; (Yea, a sword shall pierce through thy own soul also,) that the thoughts of many hearts may be revealed. This passage reveals not only yet another epiphany (another revelation that this Jesus is Christ), but it also gives our tradition a great Christmas gift: Simeon's Song, also known as the Nunc dimittis, which the choir sings at every Choral Evensong.

Collect:

Almighty and everliving God, we humbly beseech thee that, as thy only-begotten Son was this day presented in the temple, so we may be presented unto thee with pure and clean hearts by the same thy Son Jesus Christ our Lord; who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance
7:45 am – 8:45 am, Saint Thomas Church Parish House
8:00 am, Chantry Chapel
12:10 pm, Chantry Chapel
This Mass includes a healing service of Holy Unction.
12:30 pm – 1:30 pm, Saint Thomas Church Parish House
5:30 pm, High Altar
Sung by the Saint Thomas Choir of Men and Boys
6:30 pm – 7:30 pm, Andrew Hall, Parish House
Topic for this session: The Holy Trinity: Living in Community reflects our belief in God as ‘Three in One’.

Wednesday, February 3, 2016

Anskar

Archbishop of Hamburg, Missionary to Denmark and Sweden
b. 826
d. February 3, 865

In Sketches of Church History (published in 1904 by SPCK, London), J. C. Robertson writes of Anskar:

In the north of Germany, in Denmark, and in Sweden, Anskar, who had been a monk at Corbey, on the Weser, laboured for thirty-nine years with earnest devotion and with great success (AD 826-865). In addition to preaching the Gospel of salvation, he did much in such charitable works as the building of hospitals and the redemption of captives; and he persuaded the chief men of the country north of the Elba to give up their trade in slaves, which had been a source of great profit to them, but which Anskar taught them to regard as contrary to the Christian religion. Anskar was made archbishop of Hamburg and Bremen, and is styled "The Apostle of the North."

But he had to suffer many dangers and reverses in his endeavours to do good. At one time, when Hamburg was burnt by the Northmen, he lost his church, his monastery, his library, and other property; but he only said, with the patriarch Job, "The Lord gave, and the Lord hath taken away; blessed be the name of the Lord!" Then he set to work again, without being discouraged by what had befallen him, and he even made a friend of the heathen king who had led the attack on Hamburg.

Anskar died in the year 865. It is told that when some of his friends were talking of miracles which he was supposed to have done, he said, "If I were worthy in my Lord's sight, I would ask of Him to grant me one miracle--that He would make me a good man."

Collect:

Almighty and everlasting God, who didst send thy servant Anskar as an apostle to the people of Scandinavia, and didst enable him to lay a firm foundation for their conversion, though he did not see the results of his labors: Keep thy Church from discouragement in the day of small things, knowing that when thou hast begun a good work thou wilt bring it to a fruitful conclusion; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance
8:00 am, Chantry Chapel
12:10 pm, Chantry Chapel
12:30 pm – 1:30 pm, Saint Thomas Church Parish House
5:30 pm, High Altar
Sung by the Saint Thomas Choir of Men and Boys
6:15 pm, High Altar

Thursday, February 4, 2016

Cornelius

Centurion, first Gentile converted to Christianity

From Lesser Feasts and Fasts 2000:

The author of Acts considered Cornelius’ conversion very momentous for the future of Christianity. He records that it occurred as the result of divine intervention and revelation, and as a response to the preaching of Peter the chief apostle. The experience of Cornelius’ household was regarded as comparable to a new Pentecost, and it was a primary precedent for the momentous decision of the apostolic council, held in Jerusalem a few years later, to admit Gentiles to full and equal partnership with Jewish converts in the household of faith.

Collect:

O God, who by thy Spirit didst call Cornelius the Centurion to be the first Christian among the Gentiles: Grant to thy Church, we beseech thee, such a ready will to go where thou dost send and to do what thou dost command, that under thy guidance it may welcome all who turn to thee in love and faith, and proclaim the Gospel to all nations; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance
8:00 am, Chantry Chapel
12:10 pm, Chantry Chapel
12:30 pm – 1:30 pm, Saint Thomas Church Parish House
5:30 pm, High Altar
Sung by the Saint Thomas Choir of Men and Boys
6:00 pm – 7:00 pm, Saint Thomas Church Parish House
6:15 pm, High Altar
6:30 pm, Andrew Hall and the Church
Father Turner will teach the third class of a four-session course on prayer, taking us further into the experience of prayer through a sensory experience of prayer.

Friday, February 5, 2016

The Martyrs of Japan

Lesser Feasts and Fasts (2006) describes the Martyrs of Japan in this way:

The introduction of Christianity into Japan in the sixteenth century, first by the Jesuits under Francis Xavier, and then by the Franciscans, has left exciting records of heroism and self-sacrifice in the annals of Christian missionary endeavor. It has been estimated that by the end of that century there were about 300,000 baptized believers in Japan. 

Unfortunately, these initial successes were compromised by rivalries among the religious orders; and the interplay of colonial politics, both within Japan and between Japan and the Spanish and Portuguese, aroused suspicion about western intentions of conquest. After a half century of ambiguous support by some of the powerful Tokugawa shoguns, the Christian enterprise suffered cruel persecution and suppression.

The first victims were six Franciscan friars and twenty of their converts who were crucified at Nagasaki, February 5, 1597. By 1630, what was left of Christianity in Japan was driven underground. Yet it is remarkable that two hundred and fifty years later there were found many men and women, without priests, who had preserved through the generations a vestige of Christian faith.

Collect:

O God our Father, who art the source of strength to all thy saints, and who didst bring the holy martyrs of Japan through the suffering of the cross to the joys of life eternal: Grant that we, being encouraged by their example, may hold fast the faith that we profess, even unto death; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance
8:00 am, Chantry Chapel