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Open Doors

Sunday, October 1, 2017

THE FEAST OF DEDICATION

On the Feast of Dedication, we rededicate ourselves to Christ and our mission as a parish. The Feast of Dedication also serves as the launch for the 2018 Annual Appeal. We encourage you to pledge for 2018 during the months of October and November in 2017. Please consider participating in this year's appeal. No matter where you live around the globe, if you enjoy worshiping with us via the webcasts, we would appreciate your contribution.

Collect:

12:30 pm – 1:15 pm, Saint Thomas Church (meet in Narthex, just inside the Fifth Avenue entrance)

Monday, October 2, 2017

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Tuesday, October 3, 2017

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

Francis of Assisi

Friar, Founder of the Order of Friars Minor (aka Franciscans)
b. 1182
d. October 3, 1226

The Rector gave an excellent summary of the life of Francis in his sermon Blessing the Things We Fear (2007). And Fr Andrew uses the example of Francis to encourage us to choose generosity over caution in his sermon Fools for Christ's Sake (2006).

Lesser Feasts and Fasts of the Episcopal Church (2000) ends its summary of his life as follows:

"Of all the saints, Francis is the most popular and admired, but probably the least imitated; few have attained to his total identification with the poverty and suffering of Christ.

Francis left few writings; but, of these, his spirit of joyous faith comes through most truly in the “Canticle of the Sun,” which he composed at Clare’s convent of St. Damian’s.

The Hymnal version [Hymns 406 & 407] ends:
Most High, omnipotent, good Lord,
to thee be ceaseless praise outpoured,
and blessing without measure.
Let creatures all give thanks to thee,
and serve in great humility."

The Rector quotes more from the "Canticle of the Sun" in his 2003 sermon Why Pray for the Dead?

Collect:

Most high, omnipotent, good Lord, grant unto thy people grace to renounce gladly the vanities of this world; that, following the way of blessed Francis, we may for love of thee delight in thy whole creation with perfectness of joy; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Thursday, October 5, 2017

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Friday, October 6, 2017

William Tyndale

Priest, Translator
b. 1494
d. 1536

William Tyndale is one of many translators of the scriptures who we celebrate at this time of year. Recently, we remembered Jerome, and soon we'll remember Samuel Issac Joseph Schereschewsky and Henry Martyn (although in 2014, Henry Martyn's feast day falls on a Sunday, so he will be trumped by the Nineteenth Sunday after Pentecost)

Lesser Feasts & Fasts of the Episcopal Church (2000) summarizes William Tyndale as follows:

"Tyndale was determined to translate the Scriptures into English, but, despairing of official support, he left for Germany in 1524. From this point on, his life reads like a cloak-and-dagger story, as King Henry the Eighth, Cardinal Wolsey, and others, sought to destroy his work of translation and put him to death. He was finally betrayed by one whom he had befriended, and in Brussels, on October 6, 1536, he was strangled at the stake, and his body was burned.

William Tyndale was a man of a single passion, to translate the Bible into English; so that, as he said to a prominent Churchman, “If God spare my life, ere many years I will cause a boy that driveth the plough shall know more scripture than thou doest.” His accomplished work is his glory. Before his betrayal and death, he had finished and revised his translation of the New Testament, and had completed a translation of the Pentateuch and of Jonah and, though he did not live to see them published, of the historical books from Joshua through 2 Chronicles. His work has been called “a well of English undefiled.” Some eighty per cent of his version has survived in the language of later and more familiar versions, such as the Authorized (King James) Version of 1611."

If you prefer the Father's many mansions to his many rooms, you can thank Tyndale, and you might also enjoy Fr Austin's 2005 sermon With God, at Rest and not at Rest.

Collect:

Almighty God, who didst plant in the heart of thy servant William Tyndale a consuming passion to bring the Scriptures to people in their native tongue, and didst endow him with the gift of powerful and graceful expression and with strength to persevere against all obstacles: Reveal to us, we pray thee, thy saving Word, as we read and study the Scriptures, and hear them calling us to repentance and life; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Saturday, October 7, 2017

9:00 am – 3:00 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Sunday, October 8, 2017

THE EIGHTEENTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST (Pr. 22)

Collect:

Almighty and everlasting God, who art always more ready to hear than we to pray, and art wont to give more than either we desire or deserve: Pour down upon us the abundance of thy mercy, forgiving us those things whereof our conscience is afraid, and giving us those good things which we are not worthy to ask, but through the merits and mediation of Jesus Christ thy Son our Lord; who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen. (Proper 22)

12:30 pm – 1:15 pm, Saint Thomas Church (meet in Narthex, just inside the Fifth Avenue entrance)

Monday, October 9, 2017

9:00 am – 1:00 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Philip

[The Philip we remember today is not the Philip the Apostle, who we remember with Saint James in May, but Philip the Deacon and Evangelist.]

Lesser Feasts & Fasts of the Episcopal Church (2000) includes a good summary of our knowledge of Philip as follows:

"Philip, who has been traditionally referred to as a Deacon and an Evangelist, was one of seven honest men appointed, some sources say ordained, by the apostles to distribute bread and alms to the widows and the poor in Jerusalem.

After the martyrdom of Stephen, Philip went to Samaria to preach the gospel. In his travels south to Gaza he encountered an Ethiopian eunuch, a servant of the Ethiopian queen, reading the Isaiah text on the Suffering Servant. They traveled together, and in the course of their journey the Ethiopian was converted and baptized by Philip.

Subsequently, Philip traveled as a missionary from Ashdod northwards and settled in Caesarea. It was in Caesarea that he hosted St. Paul. Philip’s activities at the end of his life are the subject of speculation, but some sources place him as a bishop at Lydia in Asia Minor."

Collect:

Holy God, no one is excluded from thy love, and thy truth transformeth the minds of all who seek thee: As thy servant Philip was led to embrace the fullness of thy salvation and to bring the stranger to Baptism, so grant unto us all the grace to be heralds of the Gospel, proclaiming thy love in Jesus Christ our Savior, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Thursday, October 12, 2017

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Friday, October 13, 2017

Edward the Confessor

Collect:

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Saturday, October 14, 2017

9:00 am – 3:00 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Sunday, October 15, 2017

THE NINETEENTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST (Pr. 23)

Collect:

Lord, we pray thee that thy grace may always precede and follow us, and make us continually to be given to all good works; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen. (Proper 23)

12:30 pm – 1:15 pm, Saint Thomas Church (meet in Narthex, just inside the Fifth Avenue entrance)

Monday, October 16, 2017

Hugh Latimer, Nicholas Ridley & Thomas Cranmer

Collect:

Keep us, O Lord, constant in faith and zealous in witness, that, like thy servants, Hugh Latimer, Nicholas Ridley, and Thomas Cranmer, we may live in thy fear, die in thy favor, and rest in thy peace; for the sake of Jesus Christ thy Son our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Ignatius of Antioch

Bishop of Antioch
d.115

This early church bishop is known for his certitude, especially in defending the doctrine of the incarnation, that Jesus is fully God and fully man, against spirtual and Gnostic notions. He writes:

Be deaf to any talk that ignores Jesus Christ, of David’s lineage, of Mary; who was really born, ate and drank; was really persecuted under Pontius Pilate; was really crucified and died in the sight of heaven and earth and the underworld. He was really raised from the dead.

Collect:

Almighty God, we praise thy Name for thy bishop and martyr Ignatius of Antioch, who offered himself as grain to be ground by the teeth of wild beasts that he might present unto thee the pure bread of sacrifice. Accept, we pray thee, the willing tribute of our lives, and give us a share in the pure and spotless offering of thy Son Jesus Christ; who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

SAINT LUKE

Evangelist

In a sermon from Evensong in 2010, Fr Daniels explained:

Luke is the gospel writer who recorded in his book those two canticles that we hear at every service of Evensong – indeed, every evening office. Mary’s song, the Magnificat, comes from Luke’s gospel, as does Simeon’s song, the Nunc Dimittis, both of which we just heard. Without Saint Luke we’d have neither of those. His is a gospel marked by magnificent story-telling, brilliant uses of words and images that tell the stories that make up what many of us think about, when we think about the stories of the Gospel...read the rest here.

Collect:

Almighty God, who didst inspire thy servant Luke the physician to set forth in the Gospel the love and healing power of thy Son: Graciously continue in thy Church the like love and power to heal, to the praise and glory of thy Name; through the same thy Son Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Thursday, October 19, 2017

Henry Martyn

Collect:

O God of the nations, who didst give to thy faithful servant Henry Martyn a brilliant mind, a loving heart, and a gift for languages, that he might translate the Scriptures and other holy writings for the peoples of India and Persia: Inspire in us, we beseech thee, a love like his, eager to commit both life and talents to thee who gavest them; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Friday, October 20, 2017

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Saturday, October 21, 2017

9:00 am – 3:00 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Sunday, October 22, 2017

THE TWENTIETH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST (Pr. 24)

Collect:

Almighty and everlasting God, who in Christ hast revealed thy glory among the nations: Preserve the works of thy mercy, that thy Church throughout the world may persevere with steadfast faith in the confession of thy Name; through the same Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen. (Proper 24)

12:30 pm – 1:15 pm, Saint Thomas Church (meet in Narthex, just inside the Fifth Avenue entrance)

Monday, October 23, 2017

SAINT JAMES (THE JUST) OF JERUSALEM

This, according to Lesser Feasts and Fasts of the Episcopal Church (2000):

In the Gospel according to Matthew and in the Epistle to the Galatians, the James whom we commemorate today is called the Lord’s brother. Other writers, following Mark’s tradition, believe him to have been a cousin of Jesus. Certain apocryphal writings speak of him as a son of Joseph’s first wife. Whatever his relationship to Jesus — brother, half-brother, or cousin — James was converted after the resurrection. Eventually, he became Bishop of Jerusalem.

In the first letter to the Corinthians (15:7), Paul says that James was favored with a special appearance of the Lord before the ascension. Later, James dealt cordially with Paul at Jerusalem, when the latter came there to meet Peter and the other apostles. During the Council of Jerusalem, when there was disagreement about whether Gentile converts should be circumcised, James summed up the momentous decision with these words: “My judgment is that we should impose no irksome restrictions on those Gentiles who are turning to God” (Acts 15:19).

Eusebius, quoting from an earlier church history by Hegesippus, declares that James was surnamed “the Just.” He was holy, abstemious, did not cut his hair nor oil his body, and was continually on his knees in prayer, interceding for his people. “As many as came to believe did so through James,” says Hegesippus. 

James’ success in converting many to Christ greatly perturbed some factions in Jerusalem. According to Hegesippus, they begged him to “restrain the people, for they have gone astray to Jesus, thinking him to be the Messiah . . . we bear you witness that you are just. . . . Persuade the people that they do not go astray . . . we put our trust in you.” They then set James on the pinnacle of the temple, bidding him to preach to the multitude and turn them from Jesus. James, however, testified for the Lord. Thereupon, they hurled him from the roof to the pavement, and cudgeled him to death.

Collect:

Grant, we beseech thee, O God, that after the example of thy servant James the Just, brother of our Lord, thy Church may give itself continually to prayer and to the reconciliation of all who are at variance and enmity; through the same our Lord Jesus Christ, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Tuesday, October 24, 2017

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Thursday, October 26, 2017

Alfred the Great

King of the West Saxons
b. 849
d. 899

Collect:

O Sovereign Lord, who didst bring thy servant Alfred to a troubled throne that he might establish peace in a ravaged land and revive learning and the arts among the people: Awake in us also, we beseech thee, a keen desire to increase our understanding while we are in this world, and an eager longing to reach that endless life where all will be made clear; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Friday, October 27, 2017

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Saturday, October 28, 2017

SAINT SIMON AND SAINT JUDE

We don’t know very much about Saints Simon and Jude the Apostles.

This Saint Simon is not Peter but “Simon the Canaanite” or “Simon the Zealot.” That means this apostle was, before he followed Jesus, probably a Jewish nationalist revolutionary against the authority of Rome.

Jude, who also was called Lebbaeus and surnamed Thaddeus, is mentioned in Saint John’s Gospel as a brother of Saint James the Greater (brother also of John and son of Zebedee), and therefore is also a family member of Christ himself. The New Testament Epistle of Jude is traditionally ascribed to this Jude. For many centuries, Saint Jude Thaddeus has been regarded in popular devotion as the “patron saint of desperate or lost causes,” but the basis of this tradition is obscure.

Saints Simon and Jude are linked together as apostles to Persia (Iran) and martyrs there. The churches they founded, in spite of centuries of persecution, still exist.

Collect:

O God, we thank thee for the glorious company of the apostles, and especially on this day for Simon and Jude; and we pray that, as they were faithful and zealous in their mission, so we may with ardent devotion make known the love and mercy of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ; who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

9:00 am – 3:00 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Sunday, October 29, 2017

THE TWENTY-FIRST SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST (Pr. 25)

Collect:

Almighty and everlasting God, give unto us the increase of faith, hope, and charity; and, that we may obtain that which thou dost promise, make us to love that which thou dost command; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

12:30 pm – 1:15 pm, Saint Thomas Church (meet in Narthex, just inside the Fifth Avenue entrance)

Monday, October 30, 2017

SAINT ANDREW

A new church year begins on the Sunday closest to November 30, which is the Feast of Saint Andrew. We sometimes do not celebrate Saint Andrew on November 30 itself, when that date falls on a Sunday, as it does in 2014, in which November 30 is the First Sunday of Advent and we celebrate Saint Andrew on Monday, December 1 instead.

It is interesting that it is Saint Andrew that corresponds to the start of a new church year. Why Andrew?

Perhaps it is because, according to Saint John, Andrew was one of two disciples who followed Jesus after John the Baptist pointed Jesus out by saying, "Behold the Lamb of God." Andrew went and told his brother and brought him to Jesus. This makes Andrew among the first to recongnize that the man named Jesus was not only the Messiah, but, quite shockingly, a Messiah who would be sacrificed for his people.

Perhaps it is because, according to Saint Matthew, Andrew and his brother Peter, both fisherman, were the first to become disciples of Jesus, when he called them to make them "fishers of men." This makes them the first disciples, as well as the first evangelists.

Perhaps it is because, according to Saint John, Andrew was the one who brought the boy with the loaves and fishes to Jesus for the feelding of the multitude. This act not only marks Andrew as a faithful servant, but also, along with his recognition of Jesus as the Lamb of God, gives Andrew a central role in the development of what would become the Eucharist.

Andrew is very much at the beginning of discipleship and evangelism. And so as we celebrate his feast day, we also celebrate the beginning of a new church year.

Collect:

Almighty God, who didst give such grace to thine apostle Andrew that he readily obeyed the call of thy Son Jesus Christ, and brought his brother with him: Give unto us, who are called by thy Word, grace to follow him without delay, and to bring those near to us into his gracious presence; who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance