Calendar

Open Doors

Tuesday, January 1, 2019

9:00 am – 1:00 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Wednesday, January 2, 2019

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Thursday, January 3, 2019

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Friday, January 4, 2019

Elizabeth Seton

Collect:

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Saturday, January 5, 2019

9:00 am – 3:00 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Sunday, January 6, 2019

THE EPIPHANY

Collect:

O God, who by the leading of a star didst manifest thy only begotten Son to the peoples of the earth: Lead us, who know thee now by faith, to thy presence, where we may Behold thy glory face to face; through the same Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

12:30 pm – 1:15 pm, Saint Thomas Church (meet in Narthex, just inside the Fifth Avenue entrance)

Monday, January 7, 2019

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Tuesday, January 8, 2019

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Wednesday, January 9, 2019

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Thursday, January 10, 2019

William Laud

Archbishop of Canterbury
b. October 7, 1573
d. January 10, 1645 (beheaded)

William Laud was one of the Caroline Divines, who were influential during the seventeenth century through the reign of Charles I and then, later, after the Restoration. Among the many Caroline Divines are Lancelot Andrewes, Jeremy Taylor and Herbert Thorndike.

Collect:

Keep us, O Lord, constant in faith and zealous in witness, that, like thy servant William Laud, we may live in thy fear, die in thy favor, and rest in thy peace; for the sake of Jesus Christ thy Son our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Friday, January 11, 2019

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Saturday, January 12, 2019

9:00 am – 3:00 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance
11:00 am – 11:45 am, Resurrection Chapel
A priest will celebrate the Sacrament of Reconciliation with you.

Sunday, January 13, 2019

THE FIRST SUNDAY AFTER THE EPIPHANY

Collect:

12:30 pm – 1:15 pm, Saint Thomas Church (meet in Narthex, just inside the Fifth Avenue entrance)

Monday, January 14, 2019

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Martin Luther King, Jr.

Collect:

Almighty God, who by the hand of Moses thy servant didst lead thy people out of slavery, and didst make them free at last: Grant that thy Church, following the example of thy prophet Martin Luther King, may resist oppression in the name of thy love, and may strive to secure for all thy children the blessed liberty of the Gospel of Jesus Christ; who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Richard Meux Benson

Collect:

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Thursday, January 17, 2019

Antony

Abbot in Egypt
d. 356

Collect:

O God, who by thy Holy Spirit didst enable thy servant Antony to withstand the temptations of the world, the flesh, and the devil: Give us grace, with pure hearts and minds, to follow thee, the only God; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the same Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Saturday, January 19, 2019

Wulfstan

Bishop of Worcester
d. 1095

Collect:

Almighty God, whose only-begotten Son hath led captivity captive and given gifts to thy people: Multiply among us faithful pastors, who, like thy holy bishop Wulfstan, will give courage to those who are oppressed and held in bondage; and bring us all, we pray, into the true freedom of thy kingdom; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

9:00 am – 3:00 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance
11:00 am – 11:45 am, Resurrection Chapel
A priest will celebrate the Sacrament of Reconciliation with you.

Sunday, January 20, 2019

THE SECOND SUNDAY AFTER THE EPIPHANY

Collect:

Almighty God, whose Son our Savior Jesus Christ is the light of the world: Grant that thy people, illumined by thy Word and Sacraments, may shine with the radiance of Christ's glory, that he may be known, worshiped, and obeyed to the ends of the earth; through the same Jesus Christ our Lord, who with thee and the Holy Spirit liveth and reigneth, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

12:30 pm – 1:15 pm, Saint Thomas Church (meet in Narthex, just inside the Fifth Avenue entrance)

Monday, January 21, 2019

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Tuesday, January 22, 2019

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Wednesday, January 23, 2019

Phillips Brooks

Bishop of Massachusetts
b. 1835
d. 1893

Lesser Feasts and Fasts (2006) concludes its summary of the bishop's life in this way:

Brooks ministered with tenderness, understanding. and warm friendliness. He inspired men to enter the ministry, and taught many of them the art of preaching. He was conservative and orthodox in his theology; but his generosity of heart led him to be regarded as the leader of the liberal circles of the Church.

In 1891, he was elected Bishop of Massachusetts. The force of his personality and preaching, together with his deep devotion and loyalty, provided the spiritual leadership needed for the time. His constant concern was to turn his hearers’ thoughts to the revelations of God. “Whatever happens,” he wrote, “always remember the mysterious richness of human nature and the nearness of God to each one of us."

Brooks is the author of O Little Town of Bethlehem, which we always sing at one or more of the Lessons & Carols services in the week before Christmas.

Collect:

O everlasting God, who didst reveal truth to thy servant Phillips Brooks, and didst so form and mold his mind and heart that he was able to mediate that truth with grace and power: Grant, we pray, that all whom thou dost call to preach the Gospel may steep themselves in thy Word, and conform their lives to thy will; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Thursday, January 24, 2019

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Friday, January 25, 2019

THE CONVERSION OF SAINT PAUL

The Conversion of Saint Paul (January 25) wraps up the Octave of Prayer for Christian Unity which begins with the Confession of Saint Peter (January 18).

To understand the significance of this feast, you might consider these sermons about Saint Paul.

Collect:

O God, who, by the preaching of thine apostle Paul, hast caused the light of the Gospel to shine throughout the world: Grant, we beseech thee, that we, having his wonderful conversion in remembrance, may show forth our thankfulness unto thee for the same by following the holy doctrine which he taught; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance

Saturday, January 26, 2019

9:00 am – 3:00 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance
11:00 am – 11:45 am, Resurrection Chapel
A priest will celebrate the Sacrament of Reconciliation with you.

Sunday, January 27, 2019

THE THIRD SUNDAY AFTER THE EPIPHANY

Collect:

Give us grace, O Lord, to answer readily the call of our Savior Jesus Christ and proclaim to all people the Good News of his salvation, that we and all the whole world may perceive the glory of his marvelous works; who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

12:30 pm – 1:15 pm, Saint Thomas Church (meet in Narthex, just inside the Fifth Avenue entrance)

Monday, January 28, 2019

Thomas Aquinas

Priest and Friar
d. 1274 

Lesser Feasts and Fasts of the Episcopal Church (2006) explains the contribution of Thomas Aquinas in this way:

Thomas Aquinas is the greatest theologian of the high Middle Ages, and, next to Augustine, perhaps the greatest theologian in the history of Western Christianity. Born into a noble Italian family, probably in 1225, he entered the new Dominican Order of Preachers, and soon became an outstanding teacher in an age of intellectual ferment.

Perceiving the challenges that the recent rediscovery of Aristotle’s works might entail for traditional catholic doctrine, especially in its emphasis upon empirical knowledge derived from reason and sense perception, independent of faith and revelation, Thomas asserted that reason and revelation are in basic harmony. “Grace” (revelation), he said, “is not the denial of nature” (reason), “but the perfection of it.” This synthesis Thomas accomplished in his greatest works, the Summa Theologica and the Summa Contra Gentiles, which even today continue to exercise profound influence on Christian thought and philosophy. He was considered a bold thinker, even a “radical,” and certain aspects of his thought were condemned by the ecclesiastical authorities. His canonization on July 18, 1323, vindicated him.

Thomas understood God’s disclosure of his Name, in Exodus 3:14, “I Am Who I Am,” to mean that God is Being, the Ultimate Reality from which everything else derives its being. The difference between God and the world is that God’s essence is to exist, whereas all other beings derive their being from him by the act of creation. Although, for Thomas, God and the world are distinct, there is, nevertheless, an analogy of being between God and the world, since the Creator is reflected in his creation. It is possible, therefore, to have a limited knowledge of God, by analogy from the created world. On this basis, human reason can demonstrate that God exists; that he created the world; and that he contains in himself, as their cause, all the perfections which exist in his creation. The distinctive truths of Christian faith, however, such as the Trinity and the Incarnation, are known only by revelation.

Thomas died in 1274, just under fifty years of age. In 1369, on January 28, his remains were transferred to Toulouse. In addition to his many theological writings, he composed several eucharistic hymns. They include “O saving Victim” and “Now, my tongue, the mystery telling.”

Collect:

Almighty God, who hast enriched thy Church with the singular learning and holiness of thy servant Thomas Aquinas: Enlighten us more and more, we pray thee, by the disciplined thinking and teaching of Christian scholars, and deepen our devotion by the example of saintly lives; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

7:30 am – 6:30 pm, Fifth Avenue Entrance